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Posted: Thu Jul 27, 2006 3:58 pm
by Anti-science
Ahh, yes I know. :)

Didn't get the SCI bit.

























Check please! ->

Posted: Thu Jul 27, 2006 7:18 pm
by uncle jam
dom wrote: you can hear it as the bass on the 1st 2 tracks on my myspace
8)

Posted: Thu Jul 27, 2006 9:48 pm
by hippy dave
i'm still meaning to try running some sounds through my c64's sid filter... :chin:

Posted: Fri Jul 28, 2006 8:52 am
by Anti-science
hippy dave wrote:i'm still meaning to try running some sounds through my c64's sid filter... :chin:
Cool, Go for it mate! Let us know how it turns out. 8)

Posted: Fri Jul 28, 2006 10:22 am
by Walter Odington
I tend to use an all mannor of hardware to run shit through: compressors, distorions, mixers, filters/EQs, valves, transistors, speakers, microphones, fucked up lo-fi samplers, and blasting stuff through my audio interface so it distorts on the way in. (cue digital distortion tirade by someone ;))


I tend to create a sound using the hardware approach, and then sample it to use in a track. When I actually make the music, it tends to be all software. When I finish a tune I experiment with running the tracks through hardware again.

I found trying to use hardware in the songwriting process is not so good for me (except synths) becuase I rather have the instant recall etc of software.

Posted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 9:15 pm
by Anti-science
I just used the analogue filter on my allan & heath dj mixer to manually filter a bassline in a new tune and it sounds sweet as! I never fault of using it in production before and I think I will be using it again. :)

Posted: Sat Aug 12, 2006 12:37 am
by Tarekith
The A&H filter is actually a really kick ass filter for production stuff too. And since it's A&H, you don't need to worry about the sound quality of the rest of the mixer's signal path.

Posted: Sat Aug 12, 2006 2:41 am
by shapshankly
what is the filter made of? is it transistors?

Posted: Sat Aug 12, 2006 10:05 am
by Anti-science
Tarekith wrote:The A&H filter is actually a really kick ass filter for production stuff too. And since it's A&H, you don't need to worry about the sound quality of the rest of the mixer's signal path.
Yes thats true. The signal path is pretty clean too. A the lo-pass wih resonace is wicked on bass leads.

Im not sure what the filters are but Allen & Heath do a seprate filter box aswell so it might be the same as that.

Posted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 10:25 am
by bigboss
Do you guys do the 'out of softsynth through (cubase) into the outboard gear then back into (cubase)' in the same take, or do you record down to another device / file, then import that outboard-processed file back into cubase?

Just trying to work out the logistics of this given my current setup...

Posted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 10:30 am
by Anti-science
I usally play the audio in my sequencer thru the outboard while im recording in the sequencer. then I delete the old and keep the freshly recorded version.

Something like that. :)

Posted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 10:43 am
by bigboss
Don't you get evil send/return feedback overload when you do this?

I haven't done anything like this for so long I can't remember how (!)

Posted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 11:34 am
by Anti-science
Nope. But if you did make sure you record it! ;)

Posted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 6:41 pm
by soapdodger
bass sounds better at higher sample rates due to the shallow angle of the waveform being represented more accuratley.

saw something bout it in sound on sound recently.

Posted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 9:25 pm
by Tarekith
LOL...

Posted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 10:51 pm
by Anti-science
soapdodger wrote:bass sounds better at higher sample rates due to the shallow angle of the waveform being represented more accuratley.

saw something bout it in sound on sound recently.

bass sounds better on a big phatt sub mate!

Posted: Tue Aug 15, 2006 3:29 pm
by hippy dave
music sounds better with you, baby.